The Aids Pandemic: Complacency, Injustice, And Unfulfilled Expectations (studies In Social Medicine)

The Aids Pandemic: Complacency, Injustice, And Unfulfilled Expectations (studies In Social Medicine)
Tags: Lawrence O. Gostin

In this collection of essays, Lawrence O. Gostin, a scholar of AIDS law and policy, confronts the most pressing and controversial issues surrounding AIDS in America and around the world. He shows how HIV/AIDS affects the entire US population - infected and uninfected - by influencing its social norms, economy, and the country's role as a world leader. The nation and the world still fail to respond to the needs of people living with HIV/AIDS and continue to tolerate injustice in their treatment, Gostin argues. AIDS, both in the USA and globally, deeply affects poor and marginalized populations, and many US policies are based on conservative moral values rather than public health and social justice concerns. Gostin tackles the hard social, legal, political and ethical issues of the HIV/AIDS pandemic: privacy and discrimination, travel and immigration, clinical trials and drug pricing, exclusion of HIV-infected health-care workers, testing and treatment of pregnant women and infants, and needle-exchange programmes. He provides an inside account of AIDS policy debates together with commentary.