Resurrecting Parts: Early Christians On Desire, Reproduction, And Sexual Difference

Resurrecting Parts: Early Christians On Desire, Reproduction, And Sexual Difference
Tags: Taylor Petrey

During the late second and early third centuries C.E. the resurrection became a central question for intellectual commentary, with increasingly tense divisions between those who interpreted the resurrection as a bodily experience and those who did not. The relationship between the resurrected person and their mortal flesh was also a key point of discussion, especially in regards to sexual desires, body parts, and practices. Early Christians struggled to articulate how and why these bodily features related to the imagined resurrected self. The problems posed by the resurrection thus provoked theological analysis of the mortal body, sexual desire and gender.